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The Swiss Army Will Provide Women Soldiers With Women’s Underwear Instead Of Men’s For The First Time

The Swiss army will start issuing women’s underwear to its women recruits in an effort to increase women recruits.

Currently, all military recruits are issued with the standard uniform that includes only men’s underwear.

Women in the forces are currently issued “loose-fitting men’s underwear, often in larger sizes” that can cause discomfort, according to the BBC.

First Lieutenant Fanny Chollet, the first woman to fly an F / A-18 Hornet fighter in Switzerland poses during a press conference at Payerne Air Base photo.
First Lieutenant Fanny Chollet, the first woman to fly an F / A-18 Hornet fighter in Switzerland poses during a press conference at Payerne Air Base. (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

In a trial set to start in April, the Swiss Army will offer two types of women’s underwear for warmer and colder months.

The army hopes to increase the percentage of female members in the forces from 1% to 10% by 2030.

Marianne Binder, a member of the parliament, said by providing underwear specifically for women will encourage more women to apply to the military, according to the BBC.

Swiss army reservists wearing protective face masks arrive at Moudon military photo.
Swiss army reservists wearing protective face masks arrive at Moudon military before being deployed to support public hospitals in the battle against the second wave of Covid-19 caused by the novel coronavirus. (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

“The clothing is designed for men, but if the army is really to become more feminine, appropriate measures are needed,” she said.

An army spokesman told Swiss news site Watson that “[t]he old generation of uniforms was not geared enough to the specific needs of women,” adding that it was also reevaluating other apparel, including combat clothing, protective vests and backpacks to put more “focus on fit and functionality” since current sizes are relatively restricted.

A captain of the rescue troops of the Swiss Army salutes next to aspirant-officiers in Epeisse near Geneva photo.
A captain of the rescue troops of the Swiss Army salutes next to aspirant-officiers in Epeisse near Geneva. (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

The Swiss Defence Minister Viola Amherd has welcomed the measures, saying “compatibility” needed to be improved, BBC reported.

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